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NOTICE BOARD

More news on the Finn Class Facebook Page and Twitter feed

September 2017
 
2017 IFA Annual General Meeting - Agenda and Papers
 
August 2017 eNews
 
May 2017
 
For all news, reports, results and photos from the Finn European Championships in Marseille please go to the event website at 2017.finneuropeans.org
 
February 2017
 
Notice of Race Published and Online Entry Open for 2017 Open and U23 European Championship in Marseille. Event website here.
 
Major Championships for 2017:

Europeans - Marseille, France
Registration and Measurement • 5-7 May
Practice Race • 7 May
Racing • 8-13 May (Final Race 13 May)
2017.finneuropeans.org (coming soon) • www.ycpr.net

Silver Cup (U23 Worlds) - Balatonfured, Hungary
Registration and Measurement • 20-22 August
Practice Races/Rule 42 Clinic • 21 August
Racing 22-27 August (2,3,2,3,2,1)
2017.finnsilvercup.org (coming soon) • www.mvmse.hu

Finn Gold Cup - Balatonfoldvar, Hungary
Registration and Measurement • 1-3 September
Practice Race • 3 September
Racing • 4-10 September (Medal Race 10 September)
2017.finngoldcup.org (coming soon) • http://spartacus.hu

 

January 2017

 
Sailing World Cup Notices are posted here. For those wishing to receive invites to SWC Hyeres, please check Notice No 3.
 
 
New Documents:
Sailing World Championships Test Event Qualification System
7 –13 August 2017: Aarhus, DENMARK • Download

Aarhus 2018 Sailing World Championships Qualification System
30 July–12 August 2018 : Aarhus, DENMARK Download



All current news articles can be found in the menu on the left. Archived news can be found under the NEWS menu above.

 

2004 Finn Gold Cup - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 
 

1

GBR 3

Ben Ainslie

56.0

5

17

3

6

1

12

3

9

DNC

2

CAN 303

Richard Clarke

69.0

11

4

19

11

12

13

7

6

5

3

IRL 8

David Burrows

79.0

33

7

11

9

7

5

10

15

15

4

POL 17

Mateuzs Kuzsneirewicz

82.0

3

16

7

2

27

6

14

21

13

5

CRO 25

Marin Misura

82.0

37

6

2

20

13

19

4

11

7

6

GBR 6

Andrew Simpson

89.0

20

36

16

1*

14

4

20

4

9

7

CRO 11

Karlo Kuret

91.0

6

13

17

7

9

20

DNF

17

2

8

ESP 100

Rafael Trujillo Vllar

93.0

45

37

6

3

5

3

8

30

1

9

BRA 10

João Signorini

103.0

21

21

8

10

20

15

5

14

10

10

DEN 7

Soren Holm

104.0

15

9

25

14

19

23

9

3

12

11

DEN 200

Jonas Hogh-Christensen

116.0

4

10

9

BFD

22

10

31

10

20

12

NZL 14

Dean Barker

122.0

32

5

44

27

8

11

13

12

14

13

AUS 221

Anthony Nossites

123.0

30

14

23

5

21

7

23

13

17

14

TUR 6

Ali Enves Adakan

128.0

18

34

22

16

2

9

38

16

11

15

NED 80

Sander E. Willems

131.0

17

2

1

25

3

42

42

8

33

16

CZE 1

Michael Maier

135.0

1

28

14

38

18

29

17

24

4

17

BEL 7

Sebastian Godefroid

146.0

24

3

20

BFD

4

14

36

27

18

18

GBR 15

Charlie Cumbley

148.0

8

11

12

34

24

24

18

23

28

19

FRA 73

Guillaume Florent

155.0

19

1

53

26

6

2

11

37

DNF

20

NED 6

Stefan de Vries

165.0

9

20

24

15

17

27

44

31

22

21

BRA 1

Bruno Prada

167.0

7

DSQ

15

8

15

33

1

33

BFD

22

NED 78

Jaap Zielhuis

168.0

2

8

29

19

23

40

46

26

21

23

POL 12

Waclaw Szukiel

174.0

27

23

4

17

29

32

24

18

BFD

24

FRA 972

Bruno Ismael

180.0

26

33

36

24

10

22

DNF

2

27

25

SLO 5

Gasper Vincec

180.0

55

12

18

13

11

17

27

38

BFD

26

HUN 1

Balazs Hajdu

183.0

23

38

38

18

25

8

19

22

30

27

GBR 550

Matt Howard

191.0

25

25

13

23

26

28

32

40

19

28

CAN 41

Christopher Cook

195.0

DNF

18

37

21

31

25

21

39

3

29

ARG 1

Alejandro Colla

197.

41

40

10

4

32

21

26

42

23

30

CRO 14

Nenad Viali

210.0

49

32

41

29

41

16

6

19

26

31

SUI 7

Bruger Christoph

211.0

31

24

30

36

16

18

28

28

BFD

32

SWE 736

Johan Tillander

218.0

14

35

28

30

40

31

15

29

36

33

BRA 109

Jorge Zarif

221.0

10

46

48

42

37

35

2

1

BFD

34

SUI 1

Othmar Mueller Von Blumenvon

224.0

28

39

5

39

30

34

41

44

8

35

IRL 10

Aaron O`Grady

228.0

13

45

42

32

34

30

25

20

32

36

ESP 107

Agustin Juarez Narrero

232.0

29

29

32

33

39

37

22

25

25

37

GER 79

Michael Fellmann

240.0

22

43

39

28

OCS

RAF

40

7

6

38

ITA 15

Michele Marchesine

240.0

12

42

33

31

28

26

34

34

BFD

39

CZE 22

Babicky Roman

260.0

38

19

26

43

43

46

30

45

16

40

FIN 216

Tapio Nirkko

263.0

51

22

21

35

38

36

DNF

5

BFD

41

IRL 5

Youen Jacob

269.0

46

15

45

12

35

44

35

46

37

42

CAN 4

Mike Milner

272.0

43

26

40

40

36

41

12

DNF

34

43

HUN 5

Tibor Pallay

276.0

34

30

31

44

44

43

33

32

29

44

BRA 3

Henry Raul Boening

293.0

40

41

46

37

33

38

45

35

24

45

BRA 100

Maurício Bueno

301.0

36

44

34

41

42

39

29

41

39

46

BRA 18

Marco Aurélio de Sá Ribeiro

338.0

42

51

43

48

46

49

43

36

31

47

BRA 101

Jorge Rodrigues

362.0

35

49

47

BFD

49

DNF

49

43

35

48

USA 55

Philippe Kahn

366.0

50

50

49

47

48

45

37

48

42

49

GBR 1

Robert Deaves

371.0

48

52

51

46

50

50

39

49

38

50

ITA 1

Luca Devoti

376.0

39

27

35

DNC

DNC

DNC

DNC

DNC

DNC

51

GER 266

Michael Ellen

378.0

47

48

50

49

47

DNF

47

50

40

52

NED 8

Rodrick Casander

379.0

RAF

47

52

45

45

48

50

51

41

53

BRA 79

Gustavo Pereira Vaitsman

402.0

52

53

54

50

51

47

48

47

BFD

54

GRE 6

Emilios Papathanasiou

440.0

RAF

RAF

RAF

RAF

RAF

RAF

RAF

RAF

RAF

 
Finn Gold Cup 2004 - Rio de Janeiro
 

Saturday 14th February
 
Just five months after the close of the 2003 Finn Gold Cup in Cadiz, Spain, Finn sailors from across the world have gathered once again to compete for one of sailing's most prestigious trophies.
 
In the past, the Finn Gold Cup has been sailed in some very attractive and exotic venues, but perhaps none quite match up to the awe and splendour of Rio de Janeiro. It has been a long held dream of the Brazilian Finn Class to host the Gold Cup here, after the success of the 1998 Gold Cup in Ilha Bela, some way to the north of Rio, and these are finally being realised.
 
53 boats from 23 countries are in Rio for this carnival of Finn sailing, just a week before the real Rio carnival gets underway. The line up includes 3 previous world champions and a host of would-be hopefuls looking for a first win.
 
Since their arrival, the sailors have been out practising and have sailed two preparation regattas. The Brazilian Championship, sailed from 28-31 January, was the first chance many of the sailors had to test the waters here. Guillaume Florent (FRA) beat the one of the local favourites Joao Signorini (BRA), as well as current world champion Ben Ainslie (GBR).
 
Straight after this regatta, the South American Championships were also sailed out of Rio de Janeiro with 47 sailors taking part. Marin Misura (CRO) sailed an excellent regatta to win two races and beat Ainslie on count back after the two ties on points. Rafael Trujillo, who was second in last year's Gold Cup, finished 3rd.
 
The racing so far has been very testing with many sailors up and down the results. If the preparation regattas are anything to go by then the Gold Cup should be a very interesting regatta, and it is hard to pick a clear favourite, although with a third and second in the two regattas so far, most money would have to be on Ainslie to make it three in a row.
 
Finn sailing has a special place in the hearts of the Brazilians, as it was their very own Jorg Bruder who was the only Finn sailor ever to score three successive wins at the Finn Gold Cup. Between 1970 and 1972 Bruder won two Gold Cup by the narrowest of margins and one comfortably, after 6 times of previously finishing in the top 5. Fate decided he would remain unbeaten as he was tragically killed in an air crash on the way to France to defend his title in 1973.
 
If Ainslie has his way here over the coming week, it will be ironic that not only will Bruder have to share his record with an Englishman who achieved it on Bruder's home waters but that it was this same
Englishman who so famously beat another of Brazil's sailing heroes, Robert Scheidt, in the last Laser class race of the Sydney Olympics.
 
In the preparation regattas over the past two weeks, several sailors put in some good results. Andrew Simpson (GBR) won two races, David Burrows (IRL) finished top 5 in both regattas, and a battle royal seems to be developing between Brazil's Joao Signorini and Bruno Prada, who are fighting to determine who will represent Brazil in the Olympic regatta later this summer.
 
After some changeable weather recently, today brought almost unbroken sunshine and high temperatures, which will make for some testing racing. The practice race was held this afternoon on the course outside the harbour in mainly light and variable winds.
 
With the opening ceremony tonight, tomorrow sees the first races of the 2004 Finn Gold Cup.
 
[back up]

Sunday 15 February
 
Michael Maier makes the best of tricky first race
 
In a fitful and unpredictable breeze and under gaze of Christ the Redeemer high up on Corcovado, the first race of the 2004 Finn Gold Cup got underway in grey and damp conditions. The opening race went to Michael Maier (CZE) after taking the lead on the second upwind and holding off some strong competition on the final downwind leg.
 
After Saturday's prefect sunshine, the fleet awoke this morning to a strong wind and rain. Overnight the wind had shifted 180 degrees and was blowing onshore at the regatta centre. As the morning progressed the wind decreased and by the time of the first race at 13.00, it was down to 5-7 knots and very patchy.
 
However the scene couldn't have been more spectacular. With the start line close under Sugar Loaf Mountain and Corcovado over to the left, the grandeur of Rio Harbour and the majestic and formidable looking mountains cutting the horizon made an awesome vista from which to start a Finn race. Everyone was keen to start racing. Too keen in fact.
 
The course set was a windward leeward double loop with a gate at the end of the first downwind. After two general recalls the black flag went up and this time the fleet got away cleanly. Most of the fleet headed to the left while a few went up the middle and the right. The leaders emerged round the first mark mainly from the left side of the course, although a few of those who stayed near the middle rounded in the top 10.
 
First round was Jaap Zielhuis (NED) closely followed by fellow Dutchman Stefan de Vries (NED). Behind them chaos ensued as many sailors got caught out by the strong tide around the windward mark and bunched up in a big raft. Not surprisingly, there was a lot of shouting!
 
Zielhuis protected his lead through the downwind gate, although Jonas Hoegh-Christensen (DEN) was very close behind. These two began a tough battle heading to the centre-left of the course after taking a short hitch right. Behind them Michael Maier (CZE) and Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL) headed left and kept on going. Maier, who had rounded the gate in 6th hit the left hand corner, tacked and laid the windward mark in first place.
 
The cloud had started to clear by now and those who went left gained enormously on the right as the breeze increased. Zielhuis held onto second place with Kusznierewicz rounding in third.
 
The final downwind became a battle of wills with the breeze now starting to build in patches. However Maier kept his cool to win the first race of the regatta. Hoegh-Christensen finished in fourth, just ahead of defending champion Ben Ainslie (GBR) who commented on the tough conditions after the race.
 
Also commenting on the tough racing, Jonas Hoegh-Christensen, was still pleased with his fourth place. He said, "In conditions like these a top 10 result is always good, so I am happy with my day. I like to sail conservatively and not take too many big risks. I saw what Michael was doing but didn't want to follow him as that corner had proved to be difficult on the first upwind. So I let him go. It was a big risk for him, but today it obviously paid off nicely."
 
Some sailors didn't have such a good day. David Burrow (IRL) and Luca Devoti (ITA) got caught in the raft at the first windward mark and finished very poorly for them in 33rd and 39th places and Sebastien Godefroid (BEL) was down in 24th. However, last year's runner up Rafael Trujillo had a worse day yet, finishing in 45th.
 
[back up]

 
Tuesday 17th February
 
Nail biting wait for Andrew Simpson after dramatic win
 
Only one race today in sunny Rio, where temperatures reached 32 degrees and by the end of the race, the conditions were just about perfect for Finn sailors. Andrew Simpson (GBR) scored his first win of the regatta, although he was subject to protest by the Jury for failing to have the required equipment on board.
 
 
After an hour waiting in very sloppy waves and a fitful wind, race four finally started in 7 to 8 knots of breeze from the north east. For the third day in a row the windward leeward loop was sailed. However it took three general recalls and a black flag to get the fleet away. Second overnight Jonas Hoegh-Christensen (DEN) fell foul of the black flag along with Sebastien Godefroid (BEL) and Jorge Rodriguez (BRA).
 
Waclaw Szukiel (POL) started at the heavily biased pin end and headed left inshore and rounded the first mark just behind Rafael Trujillo-Villar (ESP) who emerged from the mid left in the lead. These two were followed by Alejandro Colla (ARG), Bruno Prada (BRA) and Andrew Simpson (GBR).
 
The fleet split on the first run with most favouring the inshore side of the course to the right. By the downwind gate, Colla had moved into the lead followed by Trujillo Villar and Szukiel. Szukiel lost heavily on the second beat but the two front runners stayed the same. In the increased breeze, now blowing 10-12 knots, Simpson moved up into a close third around the windward mark followed by Prada and Anthony Nossiter (AUS).
 
It was all change on the final run to the finish. Simpson found speed and the right side to take the lead and win the race. He was later spot checked by the Jury and found to be missing a required piece of equipment. He was given one penalty point but the race stands. Behind him Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL) put on a charge to move from 10th at the windward mark to 2nd at the finish. He had lost a lot on the second upwind after playing the shifts towards the left of the course, and fell down the fleet.
 
Rounding the windward mark alongside Ben Ainslie (GBR) the two split gybes and Kusznierewicz headed to the right of the course. Mateusz takes up the story, "I was sailing very fast down the last run, catching up many boats. After the disastrous second beat I decided to go my own way on the run and avoid the other boats as much as possible. I headed out to the right and found some clear air and nice waves and was really pleased to end up second." Third at the finish was Trujillo Villar with Colla slipping to 4th.
 
At the half way stage of the regatta, the leaders are beginning to emerge, and it has all the signs of being a high scoring regatta. Mateusz Kusznierewicz commented, "The sailing here is really tricky, the current is confusing and today the waves were a real mish-mash. However onshore the organisation is very good. All the people here are nice and it is a very nice city to be in."
 
One rejuvenated Finn sailor competing here in Rio is Dean Barker, helmsman for Team New Zealand, who last sailed a Finn in 1996 before moving into the America's Cup boats. Commenting on his performance (currently lying 28th), Barker said, "It's certainly a challenge sailing the Finn again and is a bit different from sailing the America's Cup boats! It can be very frustrating at times because you know you you can do better. I started sailing the Finn again in November last year and sailed a bit with Clifton (Webb) and Peter Fox in New Zealand, but I'm still a bit fresh. But it's great racing one on one with the other guys here."
 
When asked about how things had changed over the past eight years Barker said, "Of course the equipment has moved on a bit since I last sailed them, the boats have become more standardised so there is no longer so much of a speed differences any more, and that makes for really good racing. However, downwind technique has changed a lot since I last sailed. It is much more refined now and has improved a lot." On the future he said, "The New Zealand Olympic selection trials are in Palma and at the Europeans, so I am going home for a while before coming to Europe to try and qualify for Athens this summer."
 
 
[back up]

Wednesday 18 February
 
Ben Ainslie moves into the lead
 
The Finn Gold Cup in Rio de Janeiro saw two more races today in superb conditions in Guanabara Bay with fresh winds and great waves. A win in race 5 and a 12th in race 6 saw Ben Ainslie (GBR) move into a 7 point lead over Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL) with just three races to go. David Burrows (IRL) moved up to 3rd after some consistent races.
 
 
Race five got underway in 8 to 10 knots of breeze in a warm north-east wind. The windward leeward course was set and most sailors started down near the pin end. The majority of the fleet headed towards the left of the course. Sebastian Godefroid (BEL) and Ben Ainslie (GBR) moved towards the right and then tacked back to the left. These two rounded the top mark first and second followed by Rafael Trujillo Villar (ESP, Ali Enver Adakan (TUR).....stop! You don't want to know all that. I mean we are in Rio. It's two days to the carnival, the sun is out, it's 30 plus degrees, the wind is blowing, the water is sparkling and there are some great waves to surf down. What more could a Finn sailor want out of life?
 
The scene is awesome. The cloud has cleared giving a great view of the Sugar Loaf, Christ the Redeemer on Corcovado, Cococabana beach and some really impressive mountains behind. The mere mention of the romantic names of places in Rio conjures up a life on the beach, of beautiful people, partying, girls, sand and awesome scenery. Do you really want to know who rounded what mark in what order? I guess you do...
 
Ah hmm..to continue...and Anthony Nossiter (AUS). The overnight leader, Mateusz Kusznierewicz was struggling somewhere in the mid-20s. The leaders split gybes on the first downwind with Ainslie going to the left and Godefroid heading right. The top sailors were in their element now as the wind increased allowing them to show off their great pumping and surfing skills - under the ever watchful eye of the Jury of course. Godefroid rounded the gate in the lead but went wrong up the second beat to let Ainslie through to the lead which he held to the finish. Godefroid eventually finished 4th behind Ali Enver Adakan and Sander Willems (NED).
 
One of the most experienced sailors in the fleet, Sebastian has been sailing Finns for 14 years and will step out of his hiking pants after the Olympics in Athens this summer. Not doing quite as well as he expected here Sebbe spent the winter months sail testing, however it didn't’t quite go according to plan. “When we put together this new sail we sailed every day in a large swell and 7 to 8 knots. In Rio until today we have had flat water, so I am lacking a bit of speed.” On his plans after the summer, Sebbe says, “I am planning to go into the Tornado after the Olympics. I got a taste for speed without too much effort sailing the trimarans and also really liked the teamwork that’s involved. If you sail Finns for so long, it can get a bit boring, so it’s good to sail other boats for a change.” Tucking into a big sandwich he continues, “I am also doing some triathlons, the first one is is September, straight after the Games, but it should help me lose some weight for the Tornado.”
 
Race six started in 12-15 knots and for the first time in the regatta the traditional Olympic course was used with an upwind finish. After one general recall, the pin end marker was moved and many boats opted to start at the committee boat, Ainslie among them. However shortly after the start the wind shifted back and left those at the starboard end with some catching up to do. The majority of the fleet headed left again and at the top mark it was Guillaume Florent (FRA) leading Rafael Trujillo Villar, Emilios Papathanisiou (GRE), Balazs Hadju (HUN), Anthony Nossiter (AUS), Jonas Hoegh Christensen (DEN) and Andrew Simpson (GBR). Ainslie was somewhere in the 30s and had a lot of work to do.
 
Large waves and an increased wind facilitated two fantastic reaches, but it was still Florent at the leeward mark ahead of Trujillo and Papathansaiou. The fleet virtually all banged left again on the second beat. Papathanasiou emerged round the top mark in the lead followed by Florent and Trujillo. Positions remained the same on the run and the final beat, with Simpson moving up to fourth.
 
With a bad result apiece today, the top two from yesterday, Ainslie and Kusznierewicz, swapped positions going into the penultimate day. David Burrows is just 5 points behind the Pole and this group are 11 points ahead of the chasing group. It could be an interesting day as positions 4 through to 10 are separated by just 6 points, so tomorrow will be very important for some.
 
After racing Ainslie commented, "In the first race I got it just about right. I started at the pin end, rounded the top mark in second place and then moved into the lead on the final run. In the second race, after the general recall, they moved the pin end mark and I made a mistake by deciding to start by the committee boat. Anyway, soon after the start the wind shifted back, and those who started at the pin crossed me by miles. I rounded the top mark in the 30s, but managed to pull up a lot offwind and a few on the final beat, so I am reasonably happy with a 12th."
 
One other person who should be mentioned is David Howlett, the GBR coach here.  Now David keeps a close eye on his boys and makes sure they all know what is going on and gives them every assistance - even going as far as giving some good advice on the odd occasion. So imagine the reaction when coming alongside your beleaguered author, who expected a tow in after a hard days racing, he comes up with, “You’re the kind of person who is always saying they don’t sail enough, so here’s your big opportunity.” And with that he roars off back to the club. To add insult to injury, on the way out to the race course today, he comes alongside in a similarly jocular tone (hey very funny!) and comments, “I would give you a tow but you need the practice!” And roars off again in a cloud of spray. Great advice if ever any was needed…
 
 
Three more races are still to be sailed in this championship, two tomorrow and one Friday. Tomorrow Ainslie could make history and become only the second sailor ever to win the Gold Cup in three consecutive years.
 
[back up]

 
Thursday 19 February
 
Ben Ainslie moves one step closer to historic triple
 
The only race sailed today in the Finn Gold Cup in Rio de Janeiro saw another downwind comeback for Ben Ainslie (GBR), giving him a third place and moving him 18 points clear at the top of the results, ahead of Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL), who is just one point ahead of David Burrows (IRL). However the day belonged to Brazil, with Bruno Prada winning the race ahead of veteran Finn sailor Jorge Zarif.
 
 
Not only were the sailors tired today after yesterday's fresh winds, but the wind must also have been tired. As a result, the Finn fleet spent more time being towed around today than actually racing. The fleet headed out to Guanabara Bay for the scheduled 13.00 start. After a postponement and a wait the fleet was towed back into the harbour where a pleasant 7 to 8 knot breeze was waiting. The press had also arrived with their cameras and helicopters, so there was quite a commotion within the harbour.
 
At the start most of the favourites favoured the pin end, but Dean Barker (NZL) and Marin Misura (CRO) led half of the fleet out of the committee boat end towards the favoured right hand side. However most of the favourites including the top three overnight went to the left of the course before digging back in. But it was too late by then as even the slowest of the boats heading right crossed nearly all those who had gone left, leaving several high ranking boats with too much to do to get back in the chocolates.
 
Soren Holm (DEN) rounded the top mark in the lead followed by Nenad Viali (CRO), Misura, Chris Cook (CAN), Barker and Rafael Trujillo Villar (ESP). Ainslie rounded about 14th and headed to the right on the run, where there looked to be more pressure. It worked a treat as Ainslie rounded the downwind gate in second place just behind Joao Signorini (BRA) and just ahead of Jorge Zarif (BRA), Barker, Cook and Bruno Prada (BRA).
 
Ben takes up the story, "I had a good start and went left a bit then back to the right. I was trying to stay with Mateusz and David and they were behind me so that was OK. I rounded the top mark about 14th and then went right on the run and gained a lot to round the gate in second. I actually got into the lead on the second beat, but didn't quite go far enough right, so lost out a bit." Ainslie rounded the top mark in second place just behind Prada and just ahead of Holm and Misura. He continued, "It was really close at the finish, so I wasn't sure if I was 2nd or 3rd." In fact, Prada maintained his lead on the final downwind leg to the finish, with Zarif moving up to second to make it a Brazilian 1, 2.
 
Meanwhile Mateusz was having his own problems. He commented, "After rounding the first mark behind Ben I knew I had to attack on the next beat. I'm not here to come second or third (even though I might do that now!), so I went to the right, probably too far, and ran out of wind. It was very bad for me. I lost a lot of places, but luckily managed to catch up some on the final downwind." Kusznierewicz finished 14th to give Ainslie an 18 point cushion going into the final day tomorrow.
 
Just as the race committee tried to start a second race, the wind died and it was postponed until tomorrow. The fleet then dropped their sails and started the tow back to the club - five minutes later a stiff wind filled in from the opposite direction. The wind has been fickle and changeable all week, and with a change in the weather overnight, the final day is unlikely to be any less challenging for the 54 competitors..
 
Ainslie commented on his plans for the final day, "Tomorrow will just be a matter of keeping an eye on Mateusz and David, and trying to stay ahead of them." The Pole also reflected on the final day, "Tomorrow obviously I will still try and win but it's not going to be easy."
 
The battle to be the best home country sailor also heated up today. Bruno Prada and Joao Signorini will soon be battling it out for selection for Brazilian berth in Athens. Here in Rio, they are neck and neck going into the final day. A win for Prada and a 5th place for Signorini sees them tied on 79 points each. There will be more than one battle taking place tomorrow.
 
For those following the GBR coach's anti-towing regime against literary Finn sailors, today's request for help was simply met with a, "After what you wrote yesterday, you've got no chance of a tow now!" Well. Fair dues, but when I was at school the difference between no chance and nothing was still nothing. Imagine the pleasure this author will feel if passing said coach if he happens to have broken down on the motorway, "You can walk. You need the exercise!"
 
Tomorrow, two races are scheduled and the racing has been moved forward one hour to 12.00 in the hope that the wind will remember to get up one hour earlier. Tomorrow also sees the opening stages of the Rio Carnival.
 
[back up]

 
Friday 20 February
 
Ben claims third Finn World title in fine style
 
Milestones in sailing don't come along every day, but today in Rio de Janeiro, there was a very special milestone. Winning the Finn Gold Cup for the third time in a row, Ben Ainslie (GBR) has equaled Jorg Bruder's record set between 1970 and 72. Overcoming very challenging conditions and a very deep field of talent, Ainslie has now won all five major championships since he entered the class in 2001. With the Olympic Games just 6 months away, is there anyone who can stop this man?
 
 
The Finn Festival in Rio is over and the Rio Carnival is just starting. Rio de Janeiro has certainly put on a show to be proud of over the past 7 days and the Finn Gold Cup was just one of many preparatory events for the 2007 Pan-American Games. Most sailors here would agree that this regatta has been a great success and can't deny the beauty and attractions of Rio.
 
However, before all the congratulations could start some sailing had to be done. The courses, which were again windward leeward loops, were set inside the harbour today to ensure that two races could be sailed.
 
Ben Ainslie (GBR) takes up the story. While he admits to being very nervous before the start - especially when waiting onshore earlier in the day for the wind to pick up - as soon as the racing started he settled down. He relates, "It was essential to be at the committee boat at the start and head off right out of the tide. I got a good start and went right right before coming back towards the middle. I was watching for both Mateusz and David and they went too far in and lost the wind a bit. When they came out they were behind me and it was looking good. After that I just played the fleet up the middle, but it was pretty nerve racking at times."
 
Up at the front Jorge Zarif (BRA) was battling with Tapio Nirkko (FIN), Michael Fellmann (GER) and Soren Holm (DEN). Zarif was Brazil's Olympic representative at the 1984 Olympic Games in Long Beach, USA. He is a veteran Finn sailor and today he led from the front to record an impressive victory. A large hole in the wind to the right of the course caused quite a few problems for some sailors, but Zarif led the way round. Ainslie rounded the top mark about 14th and managed to climb up to 9th at the finish, but that didn't matter. He had beaten both his nearest rivals and now couldn't be touched for the title. However the race was still very much on for the other medals with 5 to 6 sailors in with a chance.
 
At the start of race nine, several top boats were found to be having trouble trying to negotiate the strong tidal stream around the committee boat and having to tack out and come round for another go. Several attempts to start the race ended in general recalls as the tidal set was pushing boats over and the biased line was causing bunching at the committee boat. At one false start Sebastian Godefroid (BEL) was seen inching his way along the leeward side committee boat on port tack where he was pinned by the tide and facing a number of starboard tack boats shouting at him. His response was, "This is my only way out of here. Sorry" One of those shouting at him was Mateusz Kusznierewicz. Fate would then have it that less than a minute later Mateusz was doing the same trick. Luckily a general recall was sounded soon after.
 
When the fleet finally got away, again the majority tacked and headed to the right, although for a while both sides looked good. Then a shift to the right brought those who had gone far right to the front and Rafael Trujillo Villar (ESP) led round the first mark followed by Gasper Vincec (SLO), Karlo Kuret (CRO), Babicky Roman (CZE) and Michael Maier (CZE). With the wind picking up to around 12 knots, Rafa held his lead throughout the race. Chris Cook (CAN) pulled through on the downwind leg and ended up third at the finish just behind Kuret.
 
Richard Clarke (CAN), 10 points adrift of a medal going into the day, scored a 5th, which put together with his 6th in the morning catapulted him into the silver medal position. Mateusz Kusznierewicz couldn't quite find the form he had in the early races and dropped to fourth overall. Third overnight, David Burrows (IRL) had a scrappy day but two 15th places were just enough to keep him in the bronze medal position, which he was pretty pleased about.
 
His bronze medal here this week is David's first Finn World Championship medal. He commented. "This is an amazing place. I've never been anywhere quite like it. After the pre-regatta training several of us went up to Buzios, north of Rio for a break. It was a stunning place, 20 knots winds every day and some gorgeous scenery. I have really enjoyed it here although the racing has been tough." Buzios is also the location where the Brazilians will have their Olympic selection trials in a week's time.
 
Joao Signorini (BRA), the leading sailor from Brazil concurred, " It has been a really great event. There has been a very high level of racing with the leaderboard changing many times during the week. Rio has showed that it is a place which can be very tricky. You have to stay calm to race well here and be consistent. Some guys have results all over the place, even on the same day. However it has been a hard event with some great racing. I think the organisers have done a great job in bringing it all together and I hope that all the sailors have enjoyed their time in Rio."
 
The Finn Junior World Championship had a reduced entry this year, perhaps due to the costs of getting here, but the IFA are delighted that the Brazilian Olympic Committee has presented the class with 'The Jorg Bruder Silver Cup', a perpetual trophy to be presented to the winner of the junior event, as a memorial to the late great Finn sailor from Brazil. The leading junior here is Tapio Nirkko (FIN), who finished in 40th place in this Gold Cup just four places ahead of Brazil's Henry Raul Boening. Nirkko did himself a favour in this morning's race with a 5th, as he was black-flagged in the second race as a premature starter, but still maintained a big enough points difference on the Brazilian.
 
Talking about the championship after the race, Ben Ainslie put his success here down to consistency, and agreed the conditions have been difficult. He commented, "This gives me a good confidence boost for Athens, but it is still six months away and there is a lot that can happen and a lot of hard work to do in that time."
 
Ben said, "I am really elated about this win. It's really special for me to win the Gold Cup a third time and to do it in Brazil as well is really good. It was a very tough regatta and I really am chuffed to bits to come out on top. It's always special to win a big championship like this but to win this for the third time in Brazil", Jorg Bruder's home country - the only sailor before today to win three consecutive Finn Gold Cups, "makes it very nice for me. It makes all the time and effort training worthwhile."
 
And after Athens. "Well I am probably getting involved in the America's Cup again, but nothing has been firmed up yet." And what about going for a fourth title in Moscow? "Well I'm not saying I'm never sailing a Finn again after Athens, so I'm not ruling out going to Moscow next year..."
 
An enormous number of people contributed to the success of the event including the ever present Nuno Caminada, Kadu (Richardo Baggio) - Sailing Manager of the Iate Clube do Rio de Janeiro, Marco Aurelio sa Ribeiro and the Brazilian Finn Association as well as the hard working PRO, Pedro Paulo Petersen. Marco Aurelio commented, "I think it has been a very successful event. Although the conditions were tricky, I think the sailors who did the right thing on the water were the winners. It was a fair championship and we are very pleased with the organisation."
[back up]
Copyright 2004
Robert Deaves - International Finn Association.
Reproduction in full or part welcomed with credit to author
 

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Finn format trials survey: The pros and cons

Following requests to trial a ‘first across the line’ race format, the Finn class carried out trials at two events early in 2017 – the Trofeo Princesa Sofia in Palma and the European Championship in Marseille. Both were designed around a winner-takes-all final race where the first boat across the line was the winner. As expected, both events produced a lot of feedback, good and bad, and after the Europeans the Finn Class organised an online survey to assess the success or otherwise of the trials and gather further feedback.

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